Government / 6- Puerto Rican Governors
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Piñero Governor
Jesús Toribio Piñero Jiménez (Term in office: 1946-1948)
First Puerto Rican to serve as governor, appointed by President Harry Truman. He previously served as resident commissioner in Washington (1944-1946). He participated in the foundation of the Popular Democratic Party.

Luis Muñoz Marín (Terms in office: 1949-1952/ 1953-1956/ 1957-1960/ 1961-1964)
First governor elected by the people in a popular vote. Elected as a candidate from the Popular Democratic Party, his administration lasted four terms. He was elected in 1948, 1952, 1956 and 1960. He previously served as president of the Senate (1941-1948). Muñoz Marín was one of the founders of the Popular Democratic Party and one of the principal architects of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. The development program Operation Bootstrap (called Operación Manos a la Obra in Spanish) was implemented under his administration.

Roberto Sánchez Vilella. (Term in office: 1965-1968)
Candidate for governor for the Popular Democratic Party. He was elected in 1964. Sánchez Vilella was a co-founder of the Popular Democratic Party and creator of the Peoples Party. In 1951, he participated in the writing of the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico as secretary of the Constituent Assembly. Sánchez Vilella was also sub-commissioner of the Interior Department, later known as Public Works; secretary of state; and administrator of San Juan.

Luis Alberto Ferré Aguayo. (Term in office: 1969-1972)
Candidate for governor for the New Progressive Party. He was elected in 1968. Ferré was founder of the New Progressive Party and a member of the Constituent Convention that created the Constitution for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. He was also a member of the House of Representatives (1953-1956) and president of the Senate (1977-1980) and continued serving as a senator until 1984.

Rafael Hernández Colón. (Terms in office: 1973-1976/ 1985-1988/ 1989-1992)
Hernández Colón was elected governor three times as a candidate of the Popular Democratic Party, in 1972, 1984 and 1988. Hernández Colón also served as secretary of justice during the Sánchez administration (1965-1968). Previously, he had been president of the Senate (1969). In 1972, he was the youngest governor ever elected in Puerto Rico

Carlos Romero Barceló. (Terms in office: 1977-1980/ 1981-1984)
Candidate for governor for the New Progressive Party. He was elected in 1976 and 1980. Romero was one of the founders of the New Progressive Party. Previously, he was mayor of San Juan (1969-1976) and, following his governorship, he was resident commissioner (1993-2000).

Pedro Rosselló González. (Terms in office: 1993-1996/ 1997-2000)
Candidate for governor from the New Progressive Party. He was elected in 1992 and 1996.

Sila María Calderón Serra. (Term in office: 2001-2004)
First woman governor of Puerto Rico. Calderón was elected in 2000, running as a candidate for the Popular Democratic Party. Previously, she served as mayor of San Juan (1997-2000).

Aníbal Acevedo Vilá. (Term in office: 2005-2008)
Candidate for governor for the Popular Democratic Party. He was elected in 2004. Previously, he was a member of the House of Representatives (1993-2001) and Resident Commissioner in Washington (2001-2004).

Luis Guillermo Fortuño Burset. (Term in office: 2009-2012)
Candidate for governor from the New Progressive Party. He was elected in 2008. Previously, he was Resident Commissioner in Washington (2004-2008).

Alejandro Javier García Padilla. Candidate for governor from the Popular Democratic Party. He was elected in 2012. He was a member of the Senate (2008-2012) and previously served as Secretary of the Department of Consumer Affairs (2005-2007). He began as governor in January 2, 2013.





Autor: Grupo Editorial EPRL
Published: September 11, 2014.

Version: 08120303 Rev. 1
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